Cool Kohlrabi

 

Kohlrabi

 

 

 

 

 

 
Last week’s celebration of celery has me thinking about all of those unrecognized roots vegetables out there. What exactly is a ‘root’? Well, basically plants with hard but edible roots. In the Valley this includes common vegetables like carrots, turnips, rutabaga, kohlrabi, beets, and parsnips, and some less common ones too, such as salsify and scorzonera or black salsify. MAYBE CUT? Kohlrabi is a subtlety flavored member of the ‘cabbage family’, getting its name from the German terms kohl, which means cabbage, and rabi, the word for turnip. The fact that they they’re abundantly harvested in this German and Dutch settled terroir should be no great surprise.

Ok, I’m going out on a limb and sharing a prediction, Kohlrabi will be the next kale! Kale, a media darling over the last years is abundantly found on the menus of both upscale and quick service eateries, and everywhere. Based on flavor and nutritional profile it deserves all accolades.  But make room for kohlrabi. It has vast culinary potential and truly unique super food properties.  With its odd satellite-like appearance, Kohlrabi hasn’t always lured Americans to the table, and to this day it is still more popular in Europe than here. Such a shame. Kohlrabi is delicious raw or cooked and has a sweet, mild flavor, similar to broccoli stems or the inner heart of cabbages. It’s behavior in cooking reminds me of water chestnuts – now doesn’t this open up some ideas?

So what to do with this “alien” root? Before slicing, shredding or cutting into cubes, you need to get to the tender and delicious flesh under the tough protective exterior.

The hard outer skin and the chewy fibrous layer beneath it, can easily be discarded by first using a knife to cut of the stems on both ends, as well as any protruding ‘tentacles’, then, using a vegetable peeler, peel down to the crisp and moist flesh.  It’ll take a couple of passes, but it goes quickly. Now you can prep the tuber for both raw and cooked dishes.

The tender and crisp raw kohlrabi bulb can be julienned, shaved, or grated and then used in salads and slaws. Using both the purple and green varieties of kohlrabi makes for a festive mixture. The bulb can also be cut into cubes or wedges then marinated or pickled. These crunchy little goodies can accent hors d’ouevres or appetizer plates.

Julienned or matchstick cuts of kohlrabi are perfect for a stir fry or quick sauté. A little olive oil, fresh herbs and sea salt… yum! Wedges or cubes of the bulb can be roasted or tossed into the soup or stew pot. Their edible top greens are tender and delicious, so make sure you add to the pot, or braise them with other greens like our darlin’ kale. If you have a mandoline or slicer at home, try layering slices of kohlrabi along with potatoes in your favorite gratin.  Also consider mixing kohlrabi up with shredded potatoes for crispy pancakes.

Now, where to find Kohlrabi?  Migliorelli Farm grows both the purple and green varieties in abundance — they decorate their farm stands throughout the Hudson Valley and NY Metro areas. Hopefully with their rising popularity, along with the fact that they’re easy to store at good quality, we will see them both at farm markets and supermarkets during the autumn and winter. As far as value, these ‘cabbage turnips’ are inexpensive and provide a great yield. They’re also low in calories, and oh so deliciously versatile. This should be enough to sway you to this knobby root. If not, consider that they’re a good source of vitamin C and potassium, and they contain the same cancer protective phytonutrients that other members the Brassica (cabbage) family are so well known for.

Kohlrabi Remoulade

Makes 6 to 8 servings

2 medium, kohlrabi (about 1 ½ pounds)
1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Salt to season
3 tablespoons of good quality mayonnaise*
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 small clove of garlic, minced
1 tablespoon salt preserved capers, rinsed
Pinch cayenne pepper
Finely shredded parsley to garnish

Directions

Working quickly, trim the ends from the kohlrabi and peel. Cut into halves and finely grate using a cheese grater or a food processor fitted with the shredding blade. Transfer to a medium bowl and immediately toss with lemon juice to prevent browning. Set aside.

In a small bowl, mix together the mayonnaise, mustard, and garlic; season with salt and cayenne. Fold the mixture into the bowl with the kohlrabi. Serve immediately or refrigerated, in a nonreactive airtight container, for 2 hours and up to 2 days.

Variations:

Add: shredded apples and/or cornichons

Kohlrabi Remoulade

About Kohlrabi…
Mentioning Kohlrabi typically doesn’t often light up people’s faces, but this highly underated vegetable is enjoyed in dishes around globe. It also grows exceptionally well here in the Hudson Valley.  The literal translation means “cabbage turnip” in Germany and “ugly root” in Africa. It’s flavor is anything but “ugly” offering a blend of all the wonderful flavor profiles of its cruciferous vegetable family ( broccoli, turnip, cabbage, brussels sprouts, rutagaba), and it has all of the protective phytochemicals and antioxidants they share.

So what to do with this “alien” root?

Immediately get to the tender and delicous flesh under that tough protective exterior. There is a chewy fiberours layer under the hard outer skin, so be sure to peel thoroughly down to the crisp and moist flesh. Use a paring knife to trim ends, and then work down the hard outer body to delious edible portion using a vegetable peeler.

1) Raw: Using a madoline, sharp knife, or cheese grater, slice it very thinly or shred it and eat it raw. Enjoy it on a crudite plate with a dip or use it as you would cabbage by preparing a slaw.

2) Puree: Chop, boil and and puree it then enjoy with some olive oil or butter and seasoning. Pureed kohlrabi also blends with mashed potatoes, mashed root vegetables (kohlrabi and carrots is a personal favorite).

3) Roast: Chop or slice into “fries”, toss with a bit of olive oil, season with salt and peper, and then oven roast until caramelized and tender.

4) Add to soups, stews and braises:  Kohlrabi adds flavor and nutrients to any/all cold weather cooking. Chop it and add it to your favorite bubbling winter meal. Its flavor holds up well to intense seasoning, and it’s particulary good in curries or other full flavored dishes.

5) Gratins and “pies”and quiches: Slice thinly and layer into gratins or grate then saute (with or without other vegetables) to fill pies and quiches.

Here’s one of my favorite preparations, a rift on the classic celeriac remoulade, which is a perfect winter salad:

Kohlrabi Remoulade

Makes 4 to 6 servings

2 medium, kohlrabi (about 1 ½ pounds)
1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Salt to season
3 tablespoons of good quality mayonnaise*
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 small clove of garlic, minced
1 tablespoon salt preserved capers, rinsed
Pinch cayenne pepper
Finely shredded parsley to garnish

Directions

Working quickly, trim the ends from the kohlrabi and peel. Cut into halves and finely grate using a cheese grater or a food processor fitted with the shredding blade. Transfer to a medium bowl and immediately toss with lemon juice to prevent browning. Set aside.

In a small bowl, mix together the mayonnaise, mustard, and garlic; season with salt and cayenne. Fold the mixture into the bowl with the kohlrabi. Serve immediately or allow to sit, refrigerated, in a nonreactive airtight container, for 2 hours and up to 2 days.

Variations:

Add: shredded apples and/or cornichons